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Super Savers: would you make the cut in the nation’s Dream Team?

POSTED: 11th December 2013
IN: Personal Guides
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Nearly 15% of people wish they had started saving earlier in life, and it's easy to see why.

According to recent research, us Brits are the worst in the world at saving for retirement, with the average person's savings only sufficient to cover seven years of retirement, rather than the 20 years they're actually likely to have.

Unfortunately, not everyone is good at saving. As England qualify for the World Cup 2014, we've been looking at the different player profiles and how each can overcome their difficulties to make the ultimate save.

1. Butterfingers

You do want to save, and if you were totally honest you're not in a bad position to do so. But somehow, every month, money manages to slip through your fingers all too easily…

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Solution: work out what you can afford to spare each month and lock it up in a limited or zero access savings account - if you don't see it, you can't spend it.

2. Something Always Gets in the Way

You have the best of intentions, but sadly, month after month something always comes up to prevent you from making that crucial save. Whether it's car repairs, decorating, birthdays, weddings, or Christmas, you just don't find yourself with anything left at the end of the month. 

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and

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Solution: think about your monthly outgoings. Do you buy a coffee en route to work every morning? Do you play the lottery, or go out for dinner every week? Try to identify a couple of things you could live without, calculate what they cost, and aim to stash this away in a flexible savings account – this way, you’ll still have access to it if you really need it.

For example, buying a £3.50 meal deal every day for lunch accumulates to £910 over the course of a year. Try making lunch instead for a fraction of the cost.

3. Hit & miss

You are the Joe Hart of the saving world; when it comes to stopping cash from escaping your grasp, you’re not always completely on the ball. But every so often, you manage to make a save so epic it makes up for the short-falls.

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Solution: tie up a lump sum in either a fixed rate account or Cash ISA with limited access. This way you will allow it to accrue the highest possible interest over the course of the year.

4. Money-maker

You may not be the best saver in the world, but what you lack in saving ability you more than make up for in your ability to make money when it’s needed.

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Solution: Life would be a lot less stressful if you had money to draw on when you needed it, rather than relying on your ability to make money when something comes up. Make the effort to put aside a small amount of money each month. If you set up a direct debit into a savings account every pay day, you won’t get a chance to miss it!

5. Safe-hands

You are quite literally the ultimate gatekeeper; nothing gets between you and saving. In fact, you can go for years without taking your eye off the ball.

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Solution: you don't need any help here.

So as Roy heads into his office to draw up squad selections for Rio, the question is: would you make the grade?

To find out more about how you can start to make a success of your savings habits, why not check out Aldermore personal savings accounts or get in touch with our expert advisors for more information.

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