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Baby Buffers

POSTED: 23rd January 2013
IN: Newsroom
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The average couple has savings of £2,547 in the bank before starting a family, it was revealed yesterday.

But rather than having a sum of money to spend on the baby, people are more concerned about having cash to fall back on if they struggle to cope financially when the baby is born.

More than two thirds of parents polled said they wanted to have a 'baby buffer' to fall back on and half said they wanted some cash to see them through the maternity stage when a mother's wages can plummet.

The poll by new British bank Aldermore found that more than half of couples start to save before conceiving a child to tide them over.

In fact 48 per cent of people said they had a set figure they wanted to reach before they even started trying for a baby.

Perhaps unsurprisingly 42 per cent stocked up on baby paraphernalia which on average amounted to £1,138.

Simon Healy, Managing Director at Aldermore Bank said: ''It is a wise move to start thinking about saving before you start to plan a family but it's not always possible.

''The cost of having a baby can be a shock to the system, particularly the first time around.

''Not only do you have to consider the expense of baby equipment such as buggies, cots and all the other paraphernalia but you need to consider earning less whilst on maternity or paternity leave and even childcare costs if you are planning on going back to work.''

''If children are on the horizon, it is a good idea to put something away every month or so. It all adds up and may help ease the financial burden when the new arrival makes an appearance.''

The study also showed that a quarter of expectant parents even set up a savings account for the new baby.

And a disciplined 29 per cent of parents said all debts, excluding their mortgage should be cleared before starting a family.

But a more realistic 39 per cent said although that was ideal, it was not always possible.

The average couple aimed to save £3061 so were £514 off target.

But more than one in twenty couples save an impressive £10,000 or more the poll found.

Of the 2000 parents polled all, whom had children within the last five years, 27 per cent started to save money before they started trying to conceive.

And a quarter of expectant mothers even saved in secret to have their very own baby buffer.

Of those 42 per cent said they didn't want to have to go 'cap-in-hand' to their other half whilst they were on a smaller salary than they were used to.

And 27 per cent said they wanted to be able to treat themselves to little luxuries like haircuts and beauty treatments without feeling guilty.

Whilst 21 per cent said the baby buffer they saved in secret was something to fall back on just in case of the unknown.

The research revealed that one in ten said every parent they know, saved before their children were born.

And a third were in agreement that they wanted to be financially secure before starting a family.

Although the other two thirds felt that being a good parent was not about how money you had saved in the bank.

Interestingly, 20 per cent of those polled admitted to splashing out on a new car before the impending birth of their child, citing the need for a family friendly vehicle.

18 per cent had moved house before the baby had arrived and over one in twenty put the money they saved towards a new extension.

A whopping 94 per cent of those polled said their own parents helped out financially with their newborn.

Simon Healy added: ''It's great that grandparents are helping out with some of the expense that a new baby can bring.

''And obviously the more money you can save in the run-up to starting a family the better and something like an Aldermore 30 Day Notice Cash ISA is the perfect savings vehicle, as of course, it's tax free money at the end of the day.

''It was refreshing that rather than splurging the money on high-tech baby equipment, many respondents were simply wanting some money behind them as a safety net.''

ENDS

  • Personal
  • Press Release
  • Personal Savings

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